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Rudyard Kipling >> The Jungle Book (page 11)


Late in October the seals began to leave St. Paul's for the deep sea, by families and tribes, and there was no more fighting over the nurseries, and the holluschickie played anywhere they liked. ''Next year,'' said Matkah to Kotick, ''you will be a holluschickie; but this year you must learn how to catch fish.''

They set out together across the Pacific, and Matkah showed Kotick how to sleep on his back with his flippers tucked down by his side and his little nose just out of the water. No cradle is so comfortable as the long, rocking swell of the Pacific. When Kotick felt his skin tingle all over, Matkah told him he was learning the ''feel of the water,'' and that tingly, prickly feelings meant bad weather coming, and he must swim hard and get away.

''In a little time,'' she said, ''you'll know where to swim to, but just now we'll follow Sea Pig, the Porpoise, for he is very wise.'' A school of porpoises were ducking and tearing through the water, and little Kotick followed them as fast as he could. ''How do you know where to go to?'' he panted. The leader of the school rolled his white eye and ducked under. ''My tail tingles, youngster,'' he said. ''That means there's a gale behind me. Come along! When you're south of the Sticky Water he meant the Equator and your tail tingles, that means there's a gale in front of you and you must head north. Come along! The water feels bad here.''

This was one of very many things that Kotick learned, and he was always learning. Matkah taught him to follow the cod and the halibut along the under-sea banks and wrench the rockling out of his hole among the weeds; how to skirt the wrecks lying a hundred fathoms below water and dart like a rifle bullet in at one porthole and out at another as the fishes ran; how to dance on the top of the waves when the lightning was racing all over the sky, and wave his flipper politely to the stumpy-tailed Albatross and the Man-of-war Hawk as they went down the wind; how to jump three or four feet clear of the water like a dolphin, flippers close to the side and tail curved; to leave the flying fish alone because they are all bony; to take the shoulder-piece out of a cod at full speed ten fathoms deep, and never to stop and look at a boat or a ship, but particularly a row-boat. At the end of six months what Kotick did not know about deep-sea fishing was not worth the knowing. And all that time he never set flipper on dry ground.

One day, however, as he was lying half asleep in the warm water somewhere off the Island of Juan Fernandez, he felt faint and lazy all over, just as human people do when the spring is in their legs, and he remembered the good firm beaches of Novastoshnah seven thousand miles away, the games his companions played, the smell of the seaweed, the seal roar, and the fighting. That very minute he turned north, swimming steadily, and as he went on he met scores of his mates, all bound for the same place, and they said: ''Greeting, Kotick! This year we are all holluschickie, and we can dance the Fire-dance in the breakers off Lukannon and play on the new grass. But where did you get that coat?''

Kotick's fur was almost pure white now, and though he felt very proud of it, he only said, ''Swim quickly! My bones are aching for the land.'' And so they all came to the beaches where they had been born, and heard the old seals, their fathers, fighting in the rolling mist.

That night Kotick danced the Fire-dance with the yearling seals. The sea is full of fire on summer nights all the way down from Novastoshnah to Lukannon, and each seal leaves a wake like burning oil behind him and a flaming flash when he jumps, and the waves break in great phosphorescent streaks and swirls. Then they went inland to the holluschickie grounds and rolled up and down in the new wild wheat and told stories of what they had done while they had been at sea. They talked about the Pacific as boys would talk about a wood that they had been nutting in, and if anyone had understood them he could have gone away and made such a chart of that ocean as never was. The threeЦ and four-year-old holluschickie romped down from Hutchinson's Hill crying: ''Out of the way, youngsters! The sea is deep and you don't know all that's in it yet. Wait till you've rounded the Horn. Hi, you yearling, where did you get that white coat?''

''I didn't get it,'' said Kotick. ''It grew.'' And just as he was going to roll the speaker over, a couple of black-haired men with flat red faces came from behind a sand dune, and Kotick, who had never seen a man before, coughed and lowered his head. The holluschickie just bundled off a few yards and sat staring stupidly. The men were no less than Kerick Booterin, the chief of the seal-hunters on the island, and Patalamon, his son. They came from the little village not half a mile from the sea nurseries, and they were deciding what seals they would drive up to the killing pens-for the seals were driven just like sheep-to be turned into seal-skin jackets later on.

''Ho!'' said Patalamon. ''Look! There's a white seal!''

Kerick Booterin turned nearly white under his oil and smoke, for he was an Aleut, and Aleuts are not clean people. Then he began to mutter a prayer. ''Don't touch him, Patalamon. There has never been a white seal since-since I was born. Perhaps it is old Zaharrof's ghost. He was lost last year in the big gale.''

''I'm not going near him,'' said Patalamon. ''He's unlucky. Do you really think he is old Zaharrof come back? I owe him for some gulls' eggs.''

''Don't look at him,'' said Kerick. ''Head off that drove of four-year-olds. The men ought to skin two hundred to-day, but it's the beginning of the season and they are new to the work. A hundred will do. Quick!''

Patalamon rattled a pair of seal's shoulder bones in front of a herd of holluschickie and they stopped dead, puffing and blowing. Then he stepped near and the seals began to move, and Kerick headed them inland, and they never tried to get back to their companions. Hundreds and hundreds of thousands of seals watched them being driven, but they went on playing just the same. Kotick was the only one who asked questions, and none of his companions could tell him anything, except that the men always drove seals in that way for six weeks or two months of every year.

''I am going to follow,'' he said, and his eyes nearly popped out of his head as he shuffled along in the wake of the herd.

''The white seal is coming after us,'' cried Patalamon. ''That's the first time a seal has ever come to the killing-grounds alone.''

''Hsh! Don't look behind you,'' said Kerick. ''It is Zaharrof's ghost! I must speak to the priest about this.''

The distance to the killing-grounds was only half a mile, but it took an hour to cover, because if the seals went too fast Kerick knew that they would get heated and then their fur would come off in patches when they were skinned. So they went on very slowly, past Sea Lion's Neck, past Webster House, till they came to the Salt House just beyond the sight of the seals on the beach. Kotick followed, panting and wondering. He thought that he was at the world's end, but the roar of the seal nurseries behind him sounded as loud as the roar of a train in a tunnel. Then Kerick sat down on the moss and pulled out a heavy pewter watch and let the drove cool off for thirty minutes, and Kotick could hear the fog-dew dripping off the brim of his cap. Then ten or twelve men, each with an iron-bound club three or four feet long, came up, and Kerick pointed out one or two of the drove that were bitten by their companions or too hot, and the men kicked those aside with their heavy boots made of the skin of a walrus's throat, and then Kerick said, ''Let go!'' and then the men clubbed the seals on the head as fast as they could.

Ten minutes later little Kotick did not recognize his friends any more, for their skins were ripped off from the nose to the hind flippers, whipped off and thrown down on the ground in a pile. That was enough for Kotick. He turned and galloped (a seal can gallop very swiftly for a short time) back to the sea; his little new mustache bristling with horror. At Sea Lion's Neck, where the great sea lions sit on the edge of the surf, he flung himself flipper-overhead into the cool water and rocked there, gasping miserably. ''What's here?'' said a sea lion gruffly, for as a rule the sea lions keep themselves to themselves.

''Scoochnie! Ochen scoochnie!'' (''I'm lonesome, very lonesome!'') said Kotick. ''They're killing all the holluschickie on all the beaches!''

The Sea Lion turned his head inshore. ''Nonsense!'' he said. ''Your friends are making as much noise as ever. You must have seen old Kerick polishing off a drove. He's done that for thirty years.''

''It's horrible,'' said Kotick, backing water as a wave went over him, and steadying himself with a screw stroke of his flippers that brought him all standing within three inches of a jagged edge of rock.

''Well done for a yearling!'' said the Sea Lion, who could appreciate good swimming. ''I suppose it is rather awful from your way of looking at it, but if you seals will come here year after year, of course the men get to know of it, and unless you can find an island where no men ever come you will always be driven.''

''Isn't there any such island?'' began Kotick. ''I've followed the poltoos the halibut for twenty years, andI can't say I've found it yet. But look here-you seem to have a fondness for talking to your betters-suppose you go to Walrus Islet and talk to Sea Vitch. He may know something. Don't flounce off like that. It's a six-mile swim, and if I were you I should haul out and take a nap first, little one.''

Kotick thought that that was good advice, so he swam round to his own beach, hauled out, and slept for half an hour, twitching all over, as seals will. Then he headed straight for Walrus Islet, a little low sheet of rocky island almost due northeast from Novastoshnah, all ledges and rock and gulls' nests, where the walrus herded by themselves.

He landed close to old Sea Vitch-the big, ugly, bloated, pimpled, fat-necked, long-tusked walrus of the North Pacific, who has no manners except when he is asleep-as he was then, with his hind flippers half in and half out of the surf.

''Wake up!'' barked Kotick, for the gulls were making a great noise.

''Hah! Ho! Hmph! What's that?'' said Sea Vitch, and he struck the next walrus a blow with his tusks and waked him up, and the next struck the next, and so on till they were all awake and staring in every direction but the right one.

''Hi! It's me,'' said Kotick, bobbing in the surf and looking like a little white slug.

''Well! May I be-skinned!'' said Sea Vitch, and they all looked at Kotick as you can fancy a club full of drowsy old gentlemen would look at a little boy. Kotick did not care to hear any more about skinning just then; he had seen enough of it. So he called out: ''Isn't there any place for seals to go where men don't ever come?''

''Go and find out,'' said Sea Vitch, shutting his eyes. ''Run away. We're busy here.''

Kotick made his dolphin-jump in the air and shouted as loud as he could: ''Clam-eater! Clam-eater!'' He knew that Sea Vitch never caught a fish in his life but always rooted for clams and seaweed; though he pretended to be a very terrible person. Naturally the Chickies and the Gooverooskies and the Epatkas-the Burgomaster Gulls and the Kittiwakes and the Puffins, who are always looking for a chance to be rude, took up the cry, and-so Limmershin told me-for nearly five minutes you could not have heard a gun fired on Walrus Islet. All the population was yelling and screaming ''Clam-eater! Stareek old man!'' while Sea Vitch rolled from side to side grunting and coughing.

''Now will you tell?'' said Kotick, all out of breath.

''Go and ask Sea Cow,'' said Sea Vitch. ''If he is living still, he'll be able to tell you.''

''How shall I know Sea Cow when I meet him?'' said Kotick, sheering off.

''He's the only thing in the sea uglier than Sea Vitch,'' screamed a Burgomaster gull, wheeling under Sea Vitch's nose. ''Uglier, and with worse manners! Stareek!''

Kotick swam back to Novastoshnah, leaving the gulls to scream. There he found that no one sympathized with him in his little attempt to discover a quiet place for the seals. They told him that men had always driven the holluschickie-it was part of the day's work-and that if he did not like to see ugly things he should not have gone to the killing grounds. But none of the other seals had seen the killing, and that made the difference between him and his friends. Besides, Kotick was a white seal.

''What you must do,'' said old Sea Catch, after he had heard his son's adventures, ''is to grow up and be a big seal like your father, and have a nursery on the beach, and then they will leave you alone. In another five years you ought to be able to fight for yourself.'' Even gentle Matkah, his mother, said: ''You will never be able to stop the killing. Go and play in the sea, Kotick.'' And Kotick went off and danced the Fire-dance with a very heavy little heart.

That autumn he left the beach as soon as he could, and set off alone because of a notion in his bullet-head. He was going to find Sea Cow, if there was such a person in the sea, and he was going to find a quiet island with good firm beaches for seals to live on, where men could not get at them. So he explored and explored by himself from the North to the South Pacific, swimming as much as three hundred miles in a day and a night. He met with more adventures than can be told, and narrowly escaped being caught by the Basking Shark, and the Spotted Shark, and the Hammerhead, and he met all the untrustworthy ruffians that loaf up and down the seas, and the heavy polite fish, and the scarlet spotted scallops that are moored in one place for hundreds of years, and grow very proud of it; but he never met Sea Cow, and he never found an island that he could fancy.

Title: The Jungle Book
Author: Rudyard Kipling
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